Watch Now Argentina vs Iceland Primitive Technology: Grass thatch, Mud hut


Primitive Technology: Grass thatch, Mud hut – Creating a grass thatch, mud hut from scratch.
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With the wet season at it’s peak, a shelter was needed to keep tools and materials dry as well as providing a dry work-space for future projects. So after some procrastination, I decided on a low roof design. A 2.5 m by 2.5 m hut with a ridge 2 m above the ground and side walls 75 cm high. Upright posts were put in at about 60 cm intervals along the 3 walls. The front was left open as this is more of an open workshop than a dwelling. Grass was collected from high up in the hill as it will not grow in the darker, lowland forest. Carrying the thatch to the hut was the most labor intensive part taking approximately 36 hours over the course of more than a week. The walls were then coated in soft, grey mud from a nearby clearing. The floor was coated in the same material. A large amount of rain fell due to a nearby tropical cyclone passing to the north. Despite this there were only a few leaks (mainly on the ridge line) that were subsequently patched with more grass. A fire was then lit with fire-sticks despite the damp conditions. This was done to help dry the mud walls and floor. The end of the video shows the yam mounds behind the hut doing well from of the torrential rain. The shelter will suffice for the remaining two months of rain that is expected to fall.

About Primitive Technology:
Primitive technology is a hobby where you build things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. These are the strict rules: If you want a fire, use a fire stick – An axe, pick up a stone and shape it – A hut, build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without utilizing modern technology. I do not live in the wild, but enjoy building shelter, tools, and more, only utilizing natural materials. To find specific videos, visit my playlist tab for building videos focused on pyrotechnology, shelter, weapons, food & agriculture, tools & machines, and weaving & fiber.

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Watch Now Argentina vs Iceland GIANT SEAFOOD on Africa’s Biggest Island! Catch and Cook with Primitive Technology!


🎥MALAGASY TRAIN FOOD! ABSOLUTE NIGHTMARE!! »
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» THE MALAGASY SEAFOOD

1. MANAKARA FISHING VILLAGE: Seafood Feast
ADDRESS: Manakara, Madagascar

🥜CASSAVA: Boil cassava in water for 30 minutes. Once soft, mash the cassava, mixing in crushed peanuts until the texture is similar to mashed potatoes.

🍈BREADFRUIT: Boil the breadfruit until soft, then add a bit of salt and mash.

🦐SHRIMP: Sauté shrimp with onion and tomato. Add cassava leaves on top and allow it to boil in water to create a shrimp soup.

🐟TUNA: Cut the tuna into sections and put it in a hot steel pot. Add in fried onion, tomato and salt and allow it to steam until cooked through.

🦀(What the heck? Where’s the lobster emoji?) LOBSTER: Cut the lobster down the center and grill to perfection!

💸PRICE: Tuna 2.26 USD/8,000 MGA per kg (our tuna cost 10 USD) | Rainbow Lobster 5 USD/18,000 MGA
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Hey, I’m Sonny! I’m from the US but currently call Vietnam home. I’ve been living in Asia for 10 years and started making food and travel videos to document my experiences. People either enjoyed my undeniable charm or enjoyed watching me eat things like coconut worms, and thus Best Ever Food Review Show came to be.

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Watch Now Argentina vs Iceland Ryan Tries: Primitive Building – EPIC SNOW FORT


Always been a fan of those primitive building videos and just wanted to give it a try! Welcome to the first Ryan Tries episode!

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Watch Now France vs Australia The Try Guys Reveal Their Favorite YouTubers


It’s another edition of Try Guys Game Time! On this installment the guys share some of their favorite YouTubers and the many reasons they love them. #TGGT

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Watch Now France vs Australia Primitive Technology: Yam, cultivate and cook


Primitive Technology: Yam, cultivate and cook
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About This Video:
I planted a yam in a large basket like enclosure and then 6 months later harvested, cooked and ate it. My previous attempts at growing yams were stymied by wild pigs and scrub turkeys. On learning that yams are in the area, these animals will seek out any tubers planted and eat them. So my solution was to build a large basket like enclosure to protect the growing vine. 13 wooden stakes were hammered into the ground (an odd number being important in any weaving project) and lawyer cane harvested from the forest was woven between these uprights. The basket was about 1 m in diameter and about 75 cm high.
A large yam, partially eaten by wallabies from a location further down the creek, was dug up and carried to the site. A small pit was dug in the enclosure and the yam simply placed in it. The enclosure was then back filled with dead leaves for fertiliser. As time progressed the vine grew above the basket and a long pole attached to it so it could climb into the canopy making full use of the sun.
After 6 months and no maintenance, weeding or watering the yam had grown into two large tubers whereas the original yam had rotted away leaving a thin husk. The new tubers were dug up using a digging stick. As carful as I was, the yams sill broke off with more tuber still under ground. This portion will probably strike next season anyway. In the canopy, the vine also produced smaller tubbers called “bulbils”. These were collected in a pot to be used as seed yams for a larger garden I’m planning. You can eat bulbils as well but the larger yam is generally eaten instead due to its larger size.
To cook the yam a fire pit was dug about 30 cm in diameter and about 20 cm deep. Wood was piled above the pit and set alight. The hot coals then fell into the pit where rocks where added to retain heat. The coals were scraped aside and the large tuber was broken up and thrown on top. The coals were raked back over it and a fire started on top. This cooked for 30 minutes before being pulled out of the coals. The outer layer of the yam was charred black and burning but the inside was soft and well cooked. The yam was eaten while steaming hot and tasted similar to a potato but with a crunchier texture near the outside much like bread crust. Although bland, yams provide a good deal of carbohydrates and are eaten as a staple in certain cultures. The remaining large yam tuber was tied up in a tree where rats could not eat it (hopefully).
This form of farming is a good way to get around the conventional farming practice of clearing trees to make fields. Instead the yam vine uses the trees as scaffolding to climb on, allowing it to reach the light in the forest canopy. The basket enclosure worked well to keep forest creatures from eating the investment. It also formed a good in-situ compost heap to nourish the yam as it grew. In future, I’d add sand to the mix as yams tend to do well in sandy soil and I expect it would be easier to dig up. Yams do well in dry conditions but will yield more if well-watered so digging a water retaining pit might help. Despite the large size of the yams I grew relative to ordinary potatoes, much larger ones are possible and are indeed routinely grown. The largest one from my research was 275 kg, grown in India. Yams have 116 calories per 100 grams compared to potatoes at only 93. They store well in the dry season as they are adapted to having a dormant period during these conditions. They are versatile in that they can be cooked into chips, roasted, boiled, mashed and made into a type of dough called “fu fu” typically eaten with stews.

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